September 12

35: Michael Alexander – DataPig Technologies – Power BI Bootcamp

17  comments

Michael Alexander of DataPig Technologies and the BaconBits Blog joins us on Tuesday Sept 15th at 9:05pm Eastern.

We will discuss Michael’s blog, his fascination with pigs and bacon, and Excel dashboards.

Additionally, Michael will expand on what is happening with his Excel Power BI bootcamp in Dallas, TX.

Excel Contest?

Well… kind of.

During the show, Michael offers a prize… entry into his Power BI Bootcamp.  To be entered into the contest, you need to write the proper phrase into the comments section below.  Spoiler alert… Its related to his view of a dashboard.

Have a Question For Michael?

Is there something you have always wanted to ask Michael?  Leave it in the comments section below.

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  • I’m trying to make a Magic 8 ball in excel, using randbetween and a nested if statement in another cell, but i’m getting lost somewhere. Putting the nest if statement in cell a1 for instance, if a1=1, “Out look is good” etc, etc. Then in cell b1 i have =Randbetween(1,10) but cant make it work. What am I doing wrong?

    • Hi John, I think the better way to do it would be to use CHOOSE over if. CHOOSE allows you to supply an index, and then you can return whatever is specified at that index. For instance:
      =RANDBETWEEN(1,3) -> A1
      =CHOOSE(A1, “Outlook is great”, “Not so good”, “Watch more Excel.TV Episodes”) -> B1

      As the RANDBETWEEN supplies values to A1 that are [1-3], notice the CHOOSE includes three different responses to return. If A1 = 1 then “Outlook is great,” is returned; if A1 = 2, then “No so good” is returned an so forth. In your case, you’d want to have ten items in that CHOOSE to return from.

      You could do this all with Nested IFs but it seems like CHOOSE would be easier to create and understand once its complete.

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